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Study Finds Gender Bias in Open Source Community


Gender bias affects contributions to the open source community, according to a paper published Monday. Female programmers’ suggestions for code changes in open source projects — called “pull requests” — were accepted more often than those of their male counterparts when gender was unspecified. However, that changed when the gender of a pull request’s author could be identified. Authors who could be identified by name or a profile picture as women had lower pull request acceptance rates than those who could be identified as men.

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Nintendo Drops New Portable on Market as Switch Sales Take Hold


Nintendo last week introduced a new contender in the increasingly hot portable gaming competition. The New Nintendo 2DS XL will make its debut on July 28 at a mid-range price of $149.99. It will slot in as the company’s third portable gaming system, right between its entry-level 2DS and more robust 3DS XL. The 2DS XL has the same large screen as the 3DS XL and can play all the games made for the Nintendo 3DS, New Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo DS; however, it will display them in 2D. The device is smaller than the 3DS XL, but it has the same amount of power and provides built-in NFC support for amiibo cards as well as figures.

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What People Don't Get About Tesla


Tesla is like Apple in that it represents a revolution in thinking. Although everyone seems to focus on the electric power plant, that is really a small part of the Tesla revolution, and I’m convinced that if Musk were to launch an almost-identical company but with gas engines, it would cut through the market like a hot knife through butter. In terms of volume, the electric part isn’t as much a sales accelerant as it is an impediment. Although Tesla’s valuation exceeds GM and Ford at times, old-time car company executives believe it will fail.

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Red Hat Gives JBoss AMQ a Makeover


Red Hat on Thursday announced JBoss AMQ 7, a messaging platform upgrade that enhances its overall performance and improves client availability for developers. JBoss AMQ is a lightweight, standards-based open source platform designed to enable real-time communication between applications, services, devices and the Internet of Things. It is based on the upstream Apache ActiveMQ and Apache Qpid community projects. JBoss AMQ serves as the messaging foundation for Red Hat JBoss Fuse, providing real-time, distributed messaging capabilities.

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Duty Calls Popular Shooter Back to World War II


Call of Duty will return to its World War II roots when the latest title arrives this November. The franchise has been a steady hit maker since its 2003 debut. Various titles in the series have become regular staples in e-sports tournaments and Major League Gaming. Call of Duty is one of the most popular series in video game history, selling a combined 175 million copies — second only to Take 2’s Grand Theft Auto franchise. The game has passed $11 billion in total lifetime revenue.

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Linux's Big Bang: One Kernel, Countless Distros


Even if you’re a newcomer to Linux, you’ve probably figured out that it is not a single, monolithic operating system, but a constellation of projects. The different “stars” in this constellation take the form of “distributions,” or “distros.” Each offers its own take on the Linux model. To gain an appreciation of the plethora of options offered by the range of distributions, it helps to understand how Linux started out and subsequently proliferated. With that in mind, here’s a brief introduction to Linux’s history.

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Internet Giants Ramp Up Fake News Defenses


Three major Internet brands this week announced initiatives to combat “fake news” online.
Google revealed that it had tweaked its search processes to help bring high-quality content to the top of search result pages. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales announced a new online publication that aims to fight fake news by pairing professional journalists with legions of volunteer community contributors. Meanwhile, Facebook has begun testing a feature that shows readers recommendations for articles related to the topic of an article they’ve just read.

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Millions May Have Picked Up FalseGuide Malware at Google Play Store


As many as 2 million Android users might have downloaded apps that were infected with the FalseGuide malware, security research firm Check Point warned on Monday. The oldest of the infected apps could have been uploaded to Google Play as long ago as last November, having successfully remained hidden for five months, while the newest may have been uploaded as recently as the beginning of this month. The malware has infected nearly 50 guide apps for popular games, Check Point researchers Oren Koriat, Andrey Polkovnichenko & Bogdan Melnykov noted.

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New Strain of Linux Malware Could Get Serious


A new strain of malware targeting Linux systems, dubbed “Linux/Shishiga,” could morph into a dangerous security threat. Eset on Tuesday disclosed the threat, which represents a new Lua family unrelated to previously seen LuaBot malware. Linux/Shishiga uses four different protocols — SSH, Telnet, HTTP and BitTorrent — and Lua scripts for modularity, wrote Detection Engineer Michal Malik and the Eset research team. “Lua is a language of choice of APT makers,” noted Nick Bilogorskiy, senior director of threat operations at Cyphort.

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Our Sci-Fi Future: Silly vs. Terrifying


The future is now, or at least it is coming soon. Today’s technological developments are looking very much like what once was the domain of science fiction. Maybe we don’t have domed cities and flying cars, but we do have buildings that reach to the heavens, and drones that soon could deliver our packages. Who needs a flying car when the self-driving car is just down the road? The media often notes the comparisons of technological advances to science fiction, and the go-to examples cited are often Star Trek, The Jetsons and various 1980s and 90s cyberpunk novels and similar dark fiction.